Retry only for https protocol
[elinks.git] / features.conf
blob7b0e2f43d783e5e581d3ea9f6318afb95a7debc4
1 ### Feature configuration file
3 # This file contains various compile-time configuration settings, which you can
4 # adjust below. You can fine-tune the ELinks binary to include really only what
5 # you want it to. It acts as a front-end to the configure script in the sense
6 # that it is possible to control any features in this file by passing arguments
7 # to the configure script. In fact any arguments given to the script will
8 # overrule the values set in this file.
10 # There are still some things which are to be adjusted only directly through the
11 # configure script arguments though, so check ./configure --help out as well!
13 # All dependency checking is done by the configure script so even though a
14 # feature is enabled here it is possible that it will be disabled at compile
15 # time if the dependencies are not met. Check the features.log file generated
16 # by the configure script to make sure.
18 ### Notes for users
20 # All features that can be controlled using this file are already set to their
21 # default values. The syntax used is hopefully familiar to most people.
23 # '#' chars start a comment that runs until the end of the line.
25 # The features are controlled by setting the various CONFIG_<FEATURE> variables
26 # to either 'yes' or 'no' depending on whether it should be enabled or disabled.
27 # So in order to disable bookmark support a line in this file should say:
29 #       CONFIG_BOOKMARKS=no
31 # It is also possible to simply comment out the line in order to disable it.
32 # Therefore, if the default doesn't suit you, you can either comment it out or
33 # set it to the value you desire.
35 ### Notes for developers
37 # Please strive to keep the format of all entries uniform, it will make it
38 # easier for us as well as for the users. Do not forget to accurately describe
39 # the feature and also the impact of enabling/disabling it. Follow the format of
40 # existing comments. Follow the example of XBEL when adding features which also
41 # need some detection in configure.in.
43 # Not everything is suitable for an entry in this file, maybe it would be
44 # happier directly in the configure.in. If it is really purely question of
45 # system support (X2, HAVE_SA_STORAGE), and it makes no sense for the user to
46 # touch it, do not include it here.
48 # Also, use your common sense. (Not that I would trust it that much... ;-))
49 # --pasky
53 ### Bookmarks
55 # ELinks has built-in hierarchic bookmarks support. Open the bookmarks manager
56 # by pressing 's'. When bookmarks are enabled, also support for the internal
57 # ELinks bookmarks format is always compiled in.
59 # This is a favourite target for disabling in various embedded applications.
60 # It all depends on your requirements.
62 # Also read the ``The Ultimate Bookmarks Guide'' in doc/bookmarks.txt
64 # Default: enabled
66 CONFIG_BOOKMARKS=yes
69 ### XBEL Bookmarks
71 # ELinks also supports universal XML bookmarks format called XBEL, also
72 # supported by e.g. Galeon, various "always-have-my-bookmarks" websites and
73 # number of universal bookmark converters.
75 # Frequently, you know you will not need it, then you can of course happily
76 # forcibly remove support for it and save few bytes.
78 # Default: enabled if libexpat is found and bookmarks are enabled
80 CONFIG_XBEL_BOOKMARKS=yes
83 ### Cookies
85 # Support for HTTP cookies --- a data token which the server sends the client
86 # once and then the client sends it back along each request to the server.  This
87 # mechanism is crucial e.g. for keeping HTTP sessions (you "log in" to a site,
88 # and from then on the site recognizes you usually because of the cookie), but
89 # also for various banner systems, remembering values filled to various forms,
90 # and so on. You can further tune the ELinks behaviour at runtime (whether to
91 # accept/send cookies, ask for confirmation when accepting a cookie etc).
93 # This functionality is usually quite important and you should not disable it
94 # unless you really know what are you doing.
96 # Default: enabled
98 CONFIG_COOKIES=yes
101 ### Form History
103 # The famous Competing Browser has that annoying thing which pops up when you
104 # submit a form, offering to remember it and pre-fill it the next time. And yes,
105 # ELinks can do that too! You will still need to also enable this manually at
106 # document.browse.forms.show_formhist.
108 # Many people find it extremely annoying (including pasky), however some others
109 # consider it extremely handy and will sacrifice almost anything to get it. It
110 # will not do any harm to have this compiled-in as long as you will leave it
111 # turned off (which is also the default configuration).
113 # Default: enabled
115 CONFIG_FORMHIST=yes
118 ### Global History
120 # This device records each and every page you visit (to a configurable limit).
121 # You can browse through this history in the history manager (press 'h').  Do
122 # not confuse this with the "session history", recording history of your
123 # browsing in the frame of one session (session history is the thing you move
124 # through when pressing 'back' and 'unback' or which you see in the
125 # File::History menu).
127 # Global history does not care about the order you visited the pages in, it just
128 # records that you visited it, when did you do that and the title of the page.
129 # Then, you can see when did you visit a link last time (and what was the title
130 # of the target document at that time), links can be coloured as visited etc.
132 # If you disable this feature, you will not lose any crucial functionality, just
133 # some relatively minor convenience features, which can nevertheless prove
134 # sometimes very practical.
136 # Default: enabled
138 CONFIG_GLOBHIST=yes
141 ### MIME
143 # ELinks uses a MIME system for determining the content type of documents and
144 # configuring programs for external handling. By default the option system can
145 # be used to configure how media types are handled. More info about how to set
146 # up the MIME handling using the option system can be found in the doc/mime.html
147 # file.
149 # Below are listed some additional ways to do it.
151 ### Mailcap
153 # Mailcap files describe what program - on the local system - can be used to
154 # handle a media type. The file format is defined in RFC 1524 and more info
155 # including examples can be found in the doc/mailcap.html file.
157 # This is very useful especially for clean interoperability with other
158 # MIME-aware applications and fitting nicely into the UNIX system, where this is
159 # the standard way of specifying MIME handlers. If you are not interested in
160 # that, you can still use the internal MIME associations system, though.
162 # Default: enabled
164 CONFIG_MAILCAP=yes
166 ### Mimetypes File
168 # Mimetypes file can be used to specify the relation between media types and
169 # file extensions.
171 # Basically same thing applies here as for the mailcap support.
173 # Default: enabled
175 CONFIG_MIMETYPES=yes
178 ### Gzip and Deflate Decompression
180 # This makes ELinks send "Accept-Encoding: deflate, gzip" in HTTP
181 # requests and decompress any documents received in those formats.
182 # It works with local *.gz files as well.
184 # Default: enabled if zlib is installed and new enough
186 CONFIG_GZIP=yes
189 ### Bzip2 Decompression
191 # This makes ELinks decompress local *.bz2 files.
192 # Also, ELinks sends "Accept-Encoding: bzip2" in HTTP requests
193 # and decompresses any documents received in that format,
194 # but this encoding has not been registered at
195 # http://www.iana.org/assignments/http-parameters[],
196 # so most servers probably won't use it.
198 # Default: enabled if the library is installed
200 CONFIG_BZIP2=yes
203 ### LZMA Decompression
205 # This makes ELinks decompress local *.lzma files.
206 # Also, ELinks sends "Accept-Encoding: lzma" in HTTP requests
207 # and decompresses any documents received in that format,
208 # but this encoding has not been registered at
209 # http://www.iana.org/assignments/http-parameters[],
210 # so most servers probably won't use it.
212 # To use this, first install http://tukaani.org/lzma/[LZMA Utils].
213 # Version 4.32.5 works; 4.42.2alpha also works and understands a
214 # newer LZMA file format.  This version of ELinks does not support
215 # LZMA SDK from 7-Zip.
217 # Default: disabled
219 CONFIG_LZMA=no
222 ### IPv6 Protocol Support
224 # You know this thing that was designed to obsolete IPv4 but only pasky,
225 # weirdos and projects supported with big funds really use. ;-)
227 # Default: enabled if the system supports it
229 CONFIG_IPV6=yes
232 ### URI Rewriting
234 # The goto dialog through which new URIs can be entered is an essential part of
235 # browsing in ELinks. This feature makes the dialog more powerful by making it
236 # possible to extend how entered text is handled through a set of rewrite rules
237 # (see protocol.rewrite options).
239 # There are two types of rules: simple and smart ones.
241 # Simple rewriting rules are basically URI abbreviations, making it possible to
242 # map a word to the full URI. They can also be used for hierarchic navigation to
243 # ease moving from some nested directory to the parent directory or doing other
244 # stuff with the current URI. For example, when you type 'gg' into the goto
245 # dialog, you will be materialized at Google's homepage.
247 # Smart rules can take arguments and therefore enable more advanced rewriting.
248 # The arguments could be search words to google for or a lookup query for a
249 # dictionary. Eg. type 'gg:Petr Baudis king of ELinks cvs'.
251 # This feature is also available in a more powerful form in the Lua and Guile
252 # extensions, so if you plan to or already use those, you won't miss anything by
253 # disabling this feature (besides easier and better integrated configuration).
255 # Default: enabled
257 CONFIG_URI_REWRITE=yes
260 ### BitTorrent Protocol Support
262 # The BitTorrent protocol is a protocol for distributing files in a peer-to-peer
263 # (P2P) manner. It uses the HTTP protocol for communicating with a central
264 # server and a peer-to-peer (P2P) protocol for exchanging file pieces betweens
265 # peer downloaders. The integrity of file pieces downloaded from peers are
266 # checked using cryptographic hashing (SHA1).
268 # Downloads using BitTorrent are started by first downloading a .torrent file
269 # with the MIME type "application/x-bittorrent". The file contains information
270 # which enables ELinks to ask a central server, called a tracker, for
271 # information about other downloading peers and start downloading from and
272 # uploading to them.
274 # At any time, an external handler can always be defined to take precedence of
275 # the internal BitTorrent client and the internal client can always be forced
276 # by prefixing the URI of the .torrent file with "bittorrent:"
278 # NOTE: The BitTorrent support is still experimental.
280 # Default: disabled
282 CONFIG_BITTORRENT=no
285 ### Local CGI Support
287 # ELinks can (like w3m or lynx) execute certain executable files stored on the
288 # local disks as CGIs, when you target it on them (through a URI of the 'file'
289 # scheme). ELinks emulates the complete CGI environment, like the program would
290 # be executed by a web server. See the protocol.file.cgi options tree for
291 # detailed runtime configuration.
293 # Some people just write their bookmark management application as Perl CGI
294 # script and then access it from the web browser using this feature, not needing
295 # any web server or so. Therefore, this is a great possible way to extended the
296 # browser capabilities.
298 # Even when you compile this in, you need to enable this yet in the
299 # configuration, and even then only CGI files passing certain user-defined
300 # filters (path-based) will be allowed to be executed (and there are certain
301 # other security barriers in place).
303 # Default: disabled, available if setenv() or putenv() is found
305 CONFIG_CGI=no
308 ### Data URI protocol
310 # The data URI protocol is defined in RFC 2397 and allows inclusion of small
311 # data items as "immediate" data, as if it had been included externally.
313 # A data URL might be used for arbitrary types of data. The URI
315 #       data:,A%20brief%20note
317 # encodes the text/plain string "A brief note", which might be useful in a
318 # footnote link.
320 # Default: enabled
322 CONFIG_DATA=yes
325 ### Finger User Information Protocol Support
327 # The finger protocol is a simple protocol defined in RFC 1288. The server
328 # return a friendly, human-oriented status report on either the system at the
329 # moment or a particular person in depth such as whether a user is currently
330 # logged-on, e-mail address, full name etc. As well as standard user
331 # information, it displays the contents of ".plan" file in the user's home
332 # directory. Often this file (maintained by the user) contained either useful
333 # information about the user's current activities, or alternatively all manner
334 # of humor.
336 # It is most often implemented on Unix or Unix-like systems however due to
337 # security and privacy reasons it is usually disabled or only allowed locally on
338 # the system.
340 # Default: disabled
342 CONFIG_FINGER=no
344 ### File Service Protocol
346 # File Service Protocol (FSP) is a very lightweight UDP based protocol for
347 # transferring files. FSP has many benefits over FTP, mainly for running
348 # anonymous archives. FSP protocol is valuable in all kinds of environments
349 # because it is one of the only TCP/IP protocols that is not aggressive about
350 # bandwidth, while still being sufficiently fault tolerant.
352 # FSP is what anonymous FTP *should* be!
354 # See http://fsp.sourceforge.net/ for more info.
356 # Default: disabled
358 CONFIG_FSP=no
360 ### File Transfer Protocol Support
362 # The File Transfer Protocol (FTP) is a software standard for transferring
363 # computer files between machines with widely different operating systems.
365 # Many sites that run FTP servers enable so-called "anonymous ftp". Under
366 # this arrangement, users do not need an account on the server. By default,
367 # the account name for the anonymous access is 'anonymous'. This account
368 # does not need a password, but users are commonly asked to send their email
369 # addresses as their passwords for authentication (protocol.ftp.anon_passwd),
370 # but there is no verification.
372 # See also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ftp .
374 # Default: enabled
376 CONFIG_FTP=yes
379 ### Gopher Protocol Support
381 # Gopher is a distributed document search and retrieval network protocol
382 # designed for the Internet in RFC 1436. The need for gopher arose in in the
383 # early days of the hypertext Internet where the number of documents that were
384 # being published in campus and research environments could not easily be
385 # distributed using known protocols like FTP because these documents were stored
386 # not in one place, but in many computers connected to the Internet.
388 # The support works much like local file browsing with directories (aka. menus)
389 # and various file types that can be downloaded and viewed.
391 # It is still very experimental and the CSO phone-book protocol is not
392 # implemented.
394 # Default: disabled
396 CONFIG_GOPHER=no
399 ### NNTP Protocol Support
401 # Network news transport protocol support makes it possible to access nntp
402 # and news servers and read postings. It is still very experimental and is
403 # far from being considered a ``news reader''.
405 # It is possible to list news groups on a server, articles in a news group
406 # and retrieve articles by their number or message-id.
408 # Default: disabled
410 CONFIG_NNTP=no
413 ### SMB Protocol Support
415 # ELinks supports browsing over the SMB protocol (URI 'smb' scheme),
416 # using the libsmbclient library as back-end.  Therefore, in order to
417 # have this enabled, you will need to install Samba (or at least just
418 # the libsmbclient part, if you can install it separately).
420 # This use of libsmbclient is believed to be immune to the command
421 # injection attacks (CVE-2006-5925, bug 841) from which earlier ELinks
422 # releases (0.9.0 to 0.11.1) suffered.
424 # Default: disabled
426 CONFIG_SMB=no
429 ### Cascading Style Sheets
431 # Simplistic CSS support. It is still very much in it's infancy so don't expect
432 # too much. If you have use of background colors enabled more pages will have
433 # the intended background color. Also quite a few additional text attributes are
434 # applied. One example is highlighting of search words on Google's cached pages.
436 # There are options to disable both imported style sheets to minimize network
437 # traffic and whether to use CSS at all. Also a default style sheet can be
438 # defined to control the basic layout in the HTML renderer.
440 # Default: enabled
442 CONFIG_CSS=yes
445 ### HTML Highlighting
447 # Makes it possible to view HTML source with the markup highlighted in colors
448 # configurable using CSS. It also makes values of referencing attributes
449 # accessible like the href="<uri>" attribute in <a> elements.
451 # The HTML highlighting uses components of an experimental DOM implementation
452 # still in progress so enabling this feature will add a considerable amount of
453 # code to the compiled binary. On the other hand it will help to debug what will
454 # hopefully evolve into the next generation document renderer.
456 # Default: disabled, requires that CSS is enabled
458 CONFIG_HTML_HIGHLIGHT=no
461 ### ECMAScript (JavaScript) Browser Scripting
463 # By enabling this feature, certain parts of ELinks, such as the goto URL
464 # dialog, may be extended using ECMAScript (aka. JavaScript) scripts. This can
465 # be useful to optimise your usage of ELinks.
467 # For example you can define shortcuts (or abbreviations) for URLs of sites you
468 # often visit by having a goto URL hook expand them. This can also be achieved
469 # with the URI rewrite feature (CONFIG_URI_REWRITE), however it is not as
470 # powerful as doing it with scripting.
472 # Default: enabled if Spidermonkey is found
474 CONFIG_SCRIPTING_SPIDERMONKEY=yes
477 ### Mouse Support
479 # ELinks may be controlled not only by keyboard, but also by mouse to quite some
480 # extent. You can select links, menu items, scroll document, click at buttons
481 # etc, and it should hopefully work. ELinks supports mouse control by GPM, xterm
482 # mouse reporting and TWAIN's twterm mouse reporting.
484 # It is generally nice convenience and doesn't cost too much. However, you can
485 # do everything with keyboard as you can with mouse. Also note that the xterm
486 # mouse reporting takes control over the terminal so that copy and pasting text
487 # from and to ELinks has to be done by holding down the Shift key.
489 # Default: enabled
491 CONFIG_MOUSE=yes
494 ### 88 Colors in Terminals
496 # Define to add support for using 88 colors in terminals. Note that this
497 # requires a capable terminal emulator, such as:
499 # - Thomas Dickey's XTerm, version 111 or later (check which version you have
500 #   with xterm -version) compiled with --enable-88-color.
502 # - Rxvt, version 2.7.9 or later compiled with --enable-88-color.
504 # You will still need to enable this at runtime for a given terminal in terminal
505 # options, or set your $TERM variable to xterm-88color - then, ELinks will
506 # automatically configure itself to make use of all the available terminal
507 # features, while still acting sensibly when you happen to run it in an xterm
508 # w/o the 88 colors support.
510 # When enabled, the memory usage is somewhat increased even when running in mono
511 # and 16 colors mode (the memory consumption can be especially remarkable when
512 # rendering very large documents and/or using very large terminals).  However,
513 # when you actually run it in the suitable terminal, it looks really impressive,
514 # I'd say marvelous!
516 # Default: disabled
518 CONFIG_88_COLORS=no
520 ### 256 Colors in Terminals
522 # Define to add support for using 256 colors in terminals. Note that this
523 # requires a capable terminal emulator, such as:
525 # - Thomas Dickey's XTerm, version 111 or later (check which version you have
526 #   with xterm -version) compiled with --enable-256-color.
528 # - Rxvt, version 2.7.9 or later compiled with --enable-256-color.
530 # - Recent versions of PuTTY also have some support for 256 colors.
532 # You will still need to enable this at runtime for a given terminal in terminal
533 # options, or set your $TERM variable to xterm-256color - then, ELinks will
534 # automatically configure itself to make use of all the available terminal
535 # features, while still acting sensibly when you happen to run it in an xterm
536 # w/o the 256 colors support.
538 # When enabled, the memory usage is somewhat increased even when running in mono
539 # and 16 colors mode (the memory consumption can be especially remarkable when
540 # rendering very large documents and/or using very large terminals).  However,
541 # when you actually run it in the suitable terminal, it looks really impressive,
542 # I'd say marvelous!
544 # Default: disabled
546 CONFIG_256_COLORS=no
548 ### True color
550 # Define to add support for True color. Note that only terminal capable to show
551 # it is konsole from kdebase-3.5.4. This mode eats a lot of memory.
553 # Default: disabled
555 CONFIG_TRUE_COLOR=no
557 ### Ex-mode Interface
559 # The ex-mode interface makes a prompt available when pressing ':'. The prompt
560 # can be used for entering actions like ':goto-url' and configuration file
561 # commands.
563 # The code is still very experimental and lacks much work such as tab
564 # completion.
566 # Default: disabled
568 CONFIG_EXMODE=no
571 ### LEDs
573 # These are the tiny LED-like indicators, shown at the bottom-right of the
574 # screen as [-----]. They are used for indication of various states, e.g.
575 # whether you are currently talking through a SSL-secured connection,
576 # what is the current input mode (normal or insert), JavaScript errors etc.
578 # Default: enabled
580 CONFIG_LEDS=yes
583 ### Document Marks
585 # Makes it possible to set marks in a document and then later jump to them kind
586 # of like how fragments in URIs work. It is currently only possible to jump to
587 # marks set in the current document.
589 # Default: enabled
591 CONFIG_MARKS=yes
594 ### Debug mode
596 # Assertions are evaluated and will core dump on failure. Some extra sanity
597 # checks are done, and some errors will cause core dump instead of just a
598 # message. Internal memory leak detection is activated (memory usage will grow),
599 # and every allocation/reallocation/free operations will be slower due to extra
600 # tests. Lists sanity checks are enabled, so list operations are slower. Hot-key
601 # debugging is enabled, it highlights redundant hot-keys in a menu.
603 # This option should be _always_ used by beta testers and developers, it helps
604 # to detect many issues. Binary packages maintainers should not use this option
605 # in normal situation.
607 # Default: disabled
609 CONFIG_DEBUG=no
612 ### Fast mode
614 # This option provides a way to generate a faster and smaller binary of a
615 # _stable_ version of ELinks. Please do not use it with unstable releases
616 # (unless memory footprint, performance and/or binary size are major issues for
617 # you).
619 # It disables all assertion tests and sanity checks effectively reducing safety.
620 # It disables internal memory allocation routines, directly calling libc
621 # functions (so it's much faster, but memory allocation issues and memory leaks
622 # will be not detected). It defines fmem_alloc(), and fmem_free() to be in fact
623 # alloca() and nothing, providing much faster allocations in routines where they
624 # are used
626 # Default: disabled
628 CONFIG_FASTMEM=no
631 ### Own C library functions
633 # Enable this to use the various C library stub functions that is part of the
634 # portability layer instead of those available in the C library on the system.
636 # It will make the binary slightly bigger and should only be used for testing
637 # the portability layer.
639 # Default: disabled
641 CONFIG_OWN_LIBC=no
644 ### Small binary
646 # Reduces the size of the binary but also disables a few memory consuming
647 # optimizations to make the program much lighter when running.
649 # Part of the size reduction is due to various help text not being compiled in
650 # which will affect usability. Also the disabled optimization will make ELinks
651 # run slower.
653 # See doc/small.txt for more information about how to reduce the size of ELinks.
655 # Default: disabled
657 CONFIG_SMALL=no
660 ### Unicode UTF-8 support
662 # By enabling this option you get better Unicode support. At present only some
663 # parts of ELinks are influenced with this. It includes DOM, plain, HTML
664 # renderer and user interface. Beside normal Unicode characters there is
665 # support for double-width characters (like Japanese, etc.).
667 # Some features of Unicode are not handled at all. Combining characters is
668 # most visible absence; but see CONFIG_COMBINE below.
669 # Some features are partially supported. Like line breaking between
670 # double-width characters. There is no other detection for determining when to
671 # break or not.
672 # Character conversions are still incomplete for ECMAScript strings (bug 805),
673 # local file names, and IRIs (RFC 3987).
675 # Default: enabled
677 CONFIG_UTF8=yes
680 ### Unicode combining characters support
682 # Extends CONFIG_UTF8 with spotty support for combining characters
683 # such as U+0303 COMBINING TILDE.
685 # This feature is experimental and has been filed as enhancement 824.
686 # Known bugs and weaknesses:
688 # - It assumes wcwidth(wc)==0 means wc is a combining character.
689 #   However, wcwidth also returns 0 for various control characters
690 #   (e.g. U+200E LEFT-TO-RIGHT MARK), and apparently returns -1 if
691 #   LC_CTYPE does not support the wide character.  Besides, wchar_t
692 #   might not be Unicode at all.  ELinks should instead use Unicode
693 #   character properties, perhaps via ICU.
695 # - It assumes all combining characters are nonspacing.
697 # - It works only if the terminal is using the UTF-8 charset.
699 # - It allocates an internal code for each different combining
700 #   character sequence.  A malicious web page could easily use up all
701 #   the available codes, and the ELinks process would thenceforth be
702 #   unable to display any new sequences.
704 # - It does not understand canonical equivalences.
706 # - Combining characters work only in HTML text.  They do not work in
707 #   HTML forms, HTML links, HTML document titles, plain text, menus,
708 #   dialog boxes, or keymaps.
710 # Default: disabled
712 CONFIG_COMBINE=no
715 ### Back-trace Printing
717 # Once upon a time, a disaster happens and ELinks crashes. That is a very sad
718 # event and it would be very nice to have some means how to diagnose it. In the
719 # crash handler, ELinks prints out various helpful things, however the truly
720 # important information is _where_ did it crash. Usually, users do not have gdb
721 # installed and can't provide a back-trace. However, ELinks can print a
722 # back-trace on its own, if the system supports it (currently, it is implemented
723 # only for glibc). It is not always accurate, it is useless when the ELinks
724 # binary is stripped and it still misses a lot of important information, but it
725 # can be sometimes still an indispensable help for the developers.
727 # You should keep this, unless you will strip your ELinks binary anyway, you
728 # know you are not going to report back any failures and you care about each
729 # single wasted bit.
731 # Default: enabled if the libc supports it (only glibc)
733 CONFIG_BACKTRACE=yes
736 ### Disable Root User
738 # Browsers are scary monsters used for traveling around in an even more scary
739 # world where people indifferently throw garbage files at you and threaten your
740 # perfect world. Altho' ELinks is a small monster compared to most browsers, it
741 # can still bite your head off and some might consider running it as the root
742 # user extremely dangerous. To prevent such usage simply enable this feature.
744 # Default: disabled
746 CONFIG_NO_ROOT_EXEC=no
749 # vim: filetype=sh textwidth=80